WINGOVATIONS

 PARTS AND ADVICE FOR YOUR 'OLDEN GOLDIE'

GL1100 Engine2 1975_gl1000 GL1100 Engine2

An online source dedicated to Honda's amazing four cylinder Goldwings!

GL1100 Engine2 GL1100 Engine2

Removing the clutch centre nut (all models)

Many people doing clutch work have found difficulty when it comes to removing the centre nut on our Honda Goldwings. If you tackle it this way, you'll wonder what the fuss was all about.

 

This is applicable to Honda Goldwing GL1000, GL1100 and  the GL1200, although that model requires a different step (5) due to the use of a diaphram spring instead of the coils springs

 

1) Remove the clutch lever cover

 

2) Slacken the cable adjusters right off and remove the cable from the lever

 

3) Remove the clutch cover

 

4) Slowly and evenly using a diagonal technique undo the six bolts that hold the clutch pressure release plate. If you are not careful

   with this the pressure release plate can crack! Do the same when replacing the plate!

 

5) Put back three of the springs then, using some large repair type washers under them, put the bolts back on those three. Tighten them down.

   (They don't have to be tightened right up, finger tight to the spring carrier will do). As you will note, I used some flanged nuts which were perfect

   for the job.

 

  The GL1200 requires a different step(5) due to the use of a diaphram spring instead of the coils springs. Here you will have to use three equal

  lengths of tube over the spring bolt pillars, long enough so that they are roughly 1/4" - 6mm higher than the pillars, so that when you tighten the

  bolts down they compress the diaphram spring which is at the back of the clutch drum.

 

 

6) Bend the locking tab of the centre nut lock washer back.

 

7) If the engine is still in the frame, put the bike in 1st gear and have someone stand on the rear brake, or tie the lever down somehow. 

   If it's out of the frame, use a spanner on the crankshaft timing pulley bolt.

 

  Some folk advocate using the alternator rotor bolt, but IMHO there is too much danger of slacking that bolt off. If the rotor gets loose it will

  destroy the splines on it's shaft in very short order and probably the stator as well!

 

8) Undo the centre nut. Please, please use the correct clutch nut tool for this. They are not dear; about the same price as the screwdriver you

   were going to ruin by hammering the nut off! :)  

   You may be able to use an impact tool to shock it loose if the engine is on the bench.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     If the engine is in the frame, remove the bolts and springs and then the plates.

 

     If the engine is on the bench the whole plate pack can be lifted out as a unit if you leave the springs and nuts in place.

 

10) When rebuilding, just reverse the procedure. Use a new locking washer, don't forget the Belville washer which goes in with the convex surface

     towards the nut and the spirals on the friction plates go anti-clockwise as you look at the clutch.

 

11) Lastly, the housekeeping. Before assembly, make sure you clean out any old clutch material from the bottom of the crankcases around

     the scavenge pump.       

 

Tightening the centre clutch nut (Small)

1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980  GoldWing 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987

WinGovations Copyright 2010

J G Evans

AS OF 2016, I ADVOCATE USING ALL SIX BOLTS RATHER THAN TWO OR THREE. THE REASON FOR THIS IS THAT, ESPECIALLY IF YOU USE JUST TWO, THERE IS A RISK THAT THE SPRING TOWERS CAN SPLIT IF THE BOLTS ARE NOT TIGHTENED OR LOOSENED IN VERY SMALL INCREMENTS.

THE GOLDEN RULE WHEN DOING ANYTHING ON THE CLUTCH IS 'HALF A TURN AT A TIME, DIAGONALLY'.

TIME CONSUMING AND FRUSTRATING, BUT NOTHING LIKE AS FRUSTRATING AS HAVING ONE OF THE FRAGILE ALLOY COMPONENTS FRACTURING.

PLEASE READ THE ADDENDUM AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE